Sociedad Española de Investigacion Ósea y Metabolismo Mineral

Revista de Osteoporosis y Metabolismo Mineral

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Volume 13 · Number 3 · October 2021


PRESENTACIÓN
COMITÉS
COMUNICACIONES ORALES
COMUNICACIONES PÓSTER
ÍNDICE DE AUTORES

Mesoporous silica nanoparticles and osteoporosis

Nanomedicine: The application of nanotechnology in medicine has given rise to a new discipline: nanomedicine, which, as we can imagine, is a multidisciplinary field where many main actors take part: engineers, physicists, chemists, biologists, doctors and even legislators [1]. Nanomedicines are so popular today among the scientific community due to a series of factors, among which we would highlight the control over the pharmacokinetic profile, the protection of transported therapeutic agents against possible degradation within the organism, the possibility of developing targeted therapies towards specific tissues, the possibility of including different therapeutic agents in the same transporter and even the possible inclusion of contrast agents to have a biomedical image for diagnosis. In this sense, among the possible systems of drug release, nanoparticles have acquired great prominence since they present great versatility from the point of view of their composition, shape, size, and external surface [2].

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Low-density granulocytes: A new marker of bone deterioration in patients on peritoneal dialysis

The concept of metabolic bone disease associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD-MBD, Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder) to refer to bone abnormalities (osteodystrophy), laboratory (calcium, P, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone –PTH–, fibroblast growth factor 23 –FGF23– and Klotho) and vascular (VC) or soft tissue calcification that occur in kidney patients has been established since 2007 and converge in an increase in cardiovascular risk (CVR), risk of fracture and, in short, an excess of morbidity and mortality [1,2].
Chronic inflammation plays a very important role in the development of vascular disorders in kidney patients and previous studies identified the importance of low-density granulocytes (LDG) in vascular calcification in dialysis patients compared to the control population [3], as well as in CVR of patients with lupus [4].

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Delphi Consensus on Therapeutic Strategies and Health Prevention of hypovitaminosis D

Vitamin D is an essential hormone for skeletal metabolism, since it regulates the absorption of calcium and phosphorus at the intestinal level and bone remodeling [1,2]. In addition, some studies suggest that vitamin D performs other multiple functions at the extraskeletal level, acting as a protector against diseases such as cancer, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases [1-4].
The main source of vitamin D is synthesis at the skin level by the action of ultraviolet B rays (UVB) on its precursor [2], giving rise to cholecalciferol or vitamin D3. Another less important source of cholecalciferol is found in food, mainly fish, eggs and dairy products. Regardless of its origin, cholecalciferol must be hydroxylated in the liver, becoming 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D] or calcifediol and, subsequently in a highly regulated manner, in the kidney to give rise to the active metabolite, 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D] or calcitriol [1].

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Usefulness of the trabecular bone score in adult subjects with osteogenesis imperfecta

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a congenital disease that comprises a heterogeneous group of clinical and genetic disorders of connective tissue, mainly caused by mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes of type I collagen. It has been estimated that the incidence of OI is approximately 1:10-20.000 [1-4] and the clinical manifestations can vary from almost asymptomatic forms to very severe cases. The main characteristic of this entity is bone fragility, due to a decrease in bone mass, cortical thickness and an alteration in the trabecular architecture which, together with defects in the bone matrix, affect its quality and resistance, and lead to to a marked increase in the risk of fracture, evident from childhood [1-3,5]. Classically, OI was considered an autosomal dominant genetic disorder and patients were classified into four subtypes based on clinical severity (classification by Sillence et al. [6]: type I being the mildest, followed by types IV, III and type II, the most severe that confers perinatal mortality). Over the years new genes and pathogenic variants have been identified, adding new groups to the classification (OI type V – type XX) [1,2,4,5]. However, this classification is no longer practical and some authors prefer to classify patients according to the degree of clinical involvement of the OI (mild, moderate, severe, lethal), including the genetic defect they present [4].

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Postoperative hypocalcaemia predictors after total thyroidectomy

Total thyroidectomy is one of the most frequent cervical surgeries, with a growing incidence in recent decades due to the increase in diagnoses of thyroid disease [1-3]. One of the thyroid surgery complications is hypocalcaemia due to iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism [1,2,4-11]. This hypo-function may be due to direct mechanical or thermal damage, inadvertent devascularization or removal of the parathyroid glands, post-surgical edema or hemorrhagic complications [1-4,8,9,12]. Both the direct damage, as well as the edema and devascularization, can be reversed over time. This explains why hypoparathyroidism is usually transient in most cases [3,8,12].

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Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia.Concerning two cases

Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a syndrome characterized by the association of mild or asymptomatic hereditary hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria. 3 subtypes have been described (FHH1, FHH2 and FHH3). FHH1, the most common, is due to inactivating mutations in the calcium-sensitive receptor (CaSR) gene [1-3]. Its prevalence is low, the inheritance is autosomal dominant, and it is often diagnosed by chance, because it is rarely symptomatic. Due to its clinical benignity, it is essential to establish a differential diagnosis (DD) with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) to avoid unnecessary examinations and treatments. Routine genetic testing is not accurate because biochemical tests usually establish the diagnosis [4].

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Joint recommendations on the management of patients with osteoporosis and/or fragility fractures during and after the pandemic due to COVID-19 of SEIOMM, SEFRAOS, SER, SEMI, SEGG, SEMG, SEMERGEN and SEEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the healthcare of patients with osteoporosis and fragility fractures [1].
Some strategies aimed at protecting against the spread of the virus, such as social distancing, have brought about changes in care models that are been homogeneous in all areas.
The need to limit access to health centers and infections has imposed a system of telemedicine [2] which offers many advantages to professionals and users and has become a key assistance tool to ensure social distancing. Likewise, telematic consultation can have additional applications in routine clinical practice, as it allows medical professionals to attend to patients with displacement problems and efficiently solve doubts and/or problems related to treatment, so it could be especially useful to control therapeutic compliance. However, in order to advance more effectively and secure telematic attention, always seeking the greatest agility in the responses, it should be protocolized.

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Clinical efficacy of FRAX®-based hybrid and age-dependent intervention thresholds in the Ecuadorian population

Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture [1]. Osteoporosis-related fractures are a major health problem and a significant economic and social burden worldwide. By 2050, 12.5% of hip fractures worldwide are projected to occur in the Latin American and Caribbean region [2]. Consequently, it is very important to recognize and treat people who are at high risk of fractures, for which several simple and inexpensive alternatives have been developed to identify and select people at risk who are candidates for treatment and evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) [3].

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Changes in bone mass in a child population with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Longitudinal study

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) has been associated with lower bone mass for more than 30 years [1,2], although existing data in children and adolescents are contradictory [3-8]. Published results on bone mass development in the adult diabetic population show a lower BMD in type 1 diabetics that persists over time and a higher risk of fractures [9-11]. However, in the pediatric population with DM1, longitudinal studies are very limited and with discrepant results. Some authors report a reduction in BMD during follow-up [6,12,13], while others do not observe long-term changes [14,15]. These discrepant results may be due to multiple variables such as the length of follow-up, which is almost always too short; the different ages and anthropometric variables, or the different pubertal stages of the diabetic population included in the studies [11-14].

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Effect of treatment with denosumab for 24 months in individuals with recent spinal cord injury with osteoporosis

After a spinal cord injury (SCI) there is a marked loss of bone mass and an increase in remodeling that leads to the development of osteoporosis and skeletal fractures, especially below the level of the injury [1-3]. Thus, more than 50% of patients with complete SCI develop densitometric osteoporosis one year after SCI1, which can reach 81% of patients after more than 5 years of SCI [4]. However, despite the high incidence of osteoporosis and fractures, the therapeutic approach to these patients is clearly deficient, since less than 10-20% of them receive anti-osteoporotic treatment [2,5].

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Description of the patients treated at the Fracture and Fall Prevention Unit in the context of a Fracture Liaison Service. FLS Anoia

Worldwide, 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men will experience a fragility fracture in their lifetime. Every 3 seconds there is 1 fragility fracture in the world. The most frequent fractures associated with osteoporosis are located in the hip, spine and wrist [1,2].
Hip fracture has become an international barometer of osteoporosis, associated with low bone mineral density, high health care costs, and greater disability than other types of osteoporotic fracture [3]. Only 30% of people with a hip fracture regain their pre-fracture level of physical function, and many are left with reduced mobility, loss of functional independence, and requiring long-term care. For this reason, among other reasons, the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has developed the Capture the Fracture program, aimed at reducing secondary and posterior fractures by facilitating the implementation of Fracture Liaison Services (FLS) [1,2].

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Brief Original
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Index of Authors
Index of Communications
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Letter to the Editor
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Osteology images
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